5 Gen Z Marketing Strategies To Implement in 2022

Social Media Marketing Blog

5 Gen Z Marketing Strategies To Implement in 2023


By Monique Thomas

Updated on December 7, 2022

7 minute read

How can you connect with the coolest kids on the block?

Published December 7, 2021

Stay on top of the biggest social media marketing trends!

Gen Z marketing requires more than simply selling a product.

Born between 1996 and 2010, this generation is value-conscious and drawn to brands that “keep it real.”

They’re creative, bold, and the creators of many trends on TikTok, Instagram Reels, and other platforms. And they require a slightly different approach than their millennial counterparts.

So how do you reach and connect with the Gen Z market in 2023? We're covering it all, below.

Who is Gen Z?

Young, tech savvy, and socially-minded, Gen Z is the most racially and ethnically diverse generation ever with a spending power of over $140B.

Having grown up with smartphones, the internet, and social media, these digital natives are more likely to buy from brands that have established clear values, are inclusive, and have a strong online community.

According to PRZM co-founder, Liz Toney, “They’re driving spending, are behind some of the largest behavioral and cultural shifts that we see today, and are also making decisions that will affect us for years to come.”

If you haven’t started thinking about this younger generation, 2023 is the perfect time to start.

With a few strategies tailored specifically to Gen Z, you can tap into their audience and create content they’ll engage with — without alienating your current customers.

Ready to create a solid Gen Z marketing strategy? Learn from Gen Z expert, Larry Milstein, in this free video workshop (or keep reading, below):

5 Gen Z Marketing Strategies for 2023

In order to connect with this generation of digital experts, you'll need to keep these five strategies in mind:

  1. Establish Clear Values & Mission

  2. Be Transparent & Accountable

  3. Establish Your Brand’s Personality

  4. Be Entertaining

  5. Build a Community

#1: Establish Clear Values & Mission

Before marketing to Gen Z, it’s important to establish your brand's values and mission. Why?

“Gen Zers are much more inclined to vote with our dollars, and believe a brand’s values are a reflection of our own,” explains Gen Z expert (and Gen Zer!) Larry Milstein.

Some topics that matter to Gen Z include:

  • LGBTQ+ rights: 60% of Gen Zers think same-sex couples should be able to adopt children

  • Diversity: 60% of Gen Zers say increased racial and ethnic diversity is good for society

  • Social responsibility: 70% of Gen Zers try to purchase from companies they consider ethical

“We’re 3x more likely than older generations to believe a company has a role in improving society,” adds Larry.

Take underwear brand Parade for example:

Parade’s focus on body positivity and inclusivity is redefining the underwear industry.

Their content not only helps to normalize stretch marks and body hair, but they value self-expression and are vocal advocates for LGBTQ+ rights and the decriminalization of sex work.

With clearly defined values, Parade is able to differentiate itself from other brands in its industry and engage with Gen Z audiences.

The takeaway? Establishing your brand’s values and communicating them effectively is key to connecting with Gen Z.

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#2: Be Transparent & Accountable

The next step in your Gen Z marketing strategy is to ensure you’re being transparent and taking accountability for any missteps.

Gen Z has no qualms about doing their research. They’ll do a deep dive into a brand’s website, scroll through their social media accounts, and read comments and reviews.

Brand trust is only second to price in terms of determining what brands we’re going to support. You’ve seen brands trip up because they’ve not upheld the standards that they’ve been communicating,” explains Larry.

During 2020’s resurgence of the BLM movement on social media, skincare brand Cocokind announced that moving forward, they’d be releasing a report of their team’s racial and ethnic makeup so their community could hold them accountable:

Company culture matters to Gen Z, and your brand should hold the same values externally and internally.

But it’s not enough to solely cast and work with diverse creators and influencers. Larry adds: “It needs to be built into the fabric of the brand.”

#3: Establish Your Brand’s Personality

In order to engage and connect with Gen Z, say goodbye to the millennial-focused aesthetic of perfectly curated content.

No more sleek and minimal imagery — Gen Zers want brands that are bold, have a strong voice, and a personality. Don’t be afraid to make waves!

Starface sells pimple-protectors and their website and social media content is full of bright yellow, smiley faces, and stars:

They’re able to promote their products in a light-hearted and silly way, and the strategy has seen massive success.

They have over 1M followers on TikTok with videos full of skincare routines, fun transformations, and catchy music.

For more established brands, Larry points to the Crocs and KFC collaboration as an example of targeting a younger generation:

“Love it or hate it, what they’ve done well is tap into an irony that Gen Zers gravitate towards, especially in a world where there’s massive uncertainty and unrest.”

The takeaway? The zany and weird can work too — these Crocs sold out.

DID YOU KNOW: You can plan and schedule your TikTok content in advance with Later — create an account, today:

#4: Be Entertaining

Gen Zers have an uncanny ability to filter content. With a short attention span, “you have around 8 seconds to essentially tell us why we should pay attention before we move on.”

And the best way to grab their attention is to entertain them!

Larry says makeup brand Fenty Beauty has done this effectively with both their TikTok and Instagram Reels content:

Creating fun and quick tutorials featuring various beauty influencers and creators allows Fenty Beauty to spotlight their products in an easily digestible way.

TIP: Create content that is either educational, entertaining, or valuable. What's a fun way to promote your products or services? How can you grab a user's attention and stand out from the crowd?

#5: Build a Community

Building a digital community is integral to your Gen Z marketing strategy.

According to surveys, Gen Z is the loneliest generation in America, so they’re actively looking for ways to engage and connect with like-minded individuals.

Brands can help facilitate authentic connection and conversation, but it goes beyond working with mega-influencers. The answer? Seek real people who have interesting platforms and embody your brand’s values.

“It could be a creative, an artist, a thought-leader, or an activist — find people you believe can serve as ambassadors and tap into their networks in a way that feels less transactional and more authentic,” says Larry.

Another way to build a community is to either solicit feedback from Gen Zers during product development or to celebrate those who’ve been loyal to your brand for years.

For example, Chipotle hosted digital events with superfans and special celebrity guests:

Not only will this help strengthen your sense of community, but it can humanize your brand and establish trust too.

Gen Z marketing is a great way to reach a younger generation and connect with a new type of consumer: one that is value-conscious, loves bold personalities, and is seeking community.

So, get to ideating, cool cat.

Ready to plan your content in advance? Start scheduling with Later, the #1 visual marketing platform — today!

Plan, schedule, and automatically publish your social media posts with Later.

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